Zano Drone via BBC news

Kickstarter’s Zano drone fails to fly

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Original Source: BBC news by  | Nov 11, 2015 

It was Europe’s most successful Kickstarter project – but now the Zano mini-drone is in deep crisis.

Last night, the former chief executive of Torquing Group – the firm behind the Zano – resigned. That left the thousands who had backed the firm with more than £2m a year ago in despair.

Ivan Reedman, the engineer driving the design of the mini-drone, explained why he was going in a post on a Zano forum.

“My resignation is due to personal health issues and irreconcilable differences,” he wrote.

Reedman, who stepped down as chief executive to become R&D director last year after new investors bought into the business, had been the only executive to engage with worried backers over recent months. Continue reading

moley-robotics-automated-kitchen_lr

Meet The Robot Chef That Can Prepare Your Dinner

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Original Source: Time by @MeganJGibson | April 14, 2015 

Ever since Americans were introduced to Rosie, the beloved robot maid on The Jetsons,way back in the 1960s, robotic household help has been the ultimate in futuristic dream products.

A new product from Moley Robotics might bring that future one step closer, as the company unveiled a robot chef on Tuesday at Hannover Messe, a trade fair for industrial technology in Germany. Comprised of two robotic arms in a specially designed kitchen, which includes a stove top, utensils and a sink, the device is able to reproduce the movements of a human chef in order to create a meal from scratch. The robot learns the movements after they are performed by a human chef, captured on a 3D camera and uploaded into the computer. Continue reading

ehang ghost drone 2 venturebeat

Ehang launches Ghost Drone 2.0 with VR goggles and gyroscope control

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Original Source: Venturebeat by  | 

Chinese drone maker Ehang just launched the Ghost 2.0, a consumer drone that comes with virtual reality goggles, allowing its user to experience flight through the drone’s 4K camera. While this is still unusual, Ehang is not the first drone company to offer such a feature.

Full pricing details don’t appear to have been announced yet, though a basic model without VR goggles or camera is listed at $599 on the company’s website (available at $499 for the first 100 orders, due to ship in six weeks).

Expect the goggle and camera version to cost substantially more — probablysomewhere around $1,500, though that’s just a guess at this point. The company is also offering a “trade-up program” for owners of the original Ghost drone that launched last year, though again, specifics are not yet available.

Screen Shot 2015-11-05 at 15.12.23The drone is piloted through the Ehang Playapp, available on both Android and iOS, which takes advantage of a smartphone or tablet’s gyroscope to enable tilt control, among other features — “Just tilt your hand and your Ghost Drone will follow the gesture,” Ehang said. (This feature is new to the Ghost 2.0.)

In a nifty addition, the VR goggles come with a similar mechanism — head-tracking — which allows the user to simply look up or down in order to tilt the drone. Continue reading

DJI manifold Drone computer via techcrunch

DJI Teams Up With Canonical To Launch Embedded Computer For Drones

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Original Source: Techcrunch by

Drone manufacturer DJI and Canonical, the corporate entity behind the Ubuntu Linux distribution, today announced the launch of Manifold, a small embedded computer that’s optimized for building applications for drones.

The Manifold only fits on top of DJI’s Matrice 100 platform, so don’t expect to put this one on your phantom drone. The $3,300 Matrice 100 is essentially DJI’s flying developer platform, with the ability to carry hardware like the Manifold and customizable sensors. Continue reading

Made for Solo by 3DR

3DR Launches the “Made for Solo” drone developer platform

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Original Source:  Engaget by James Trew | @itstrew | October 20th 2015 

When 3D Robotics announced its Solo quadcopter, one of the more intriguing features was an accessory bay. Instead of opening up the Solo and wiring in, or screwing on an accessory (as is common with hobby drones — including the ubiquitous Phantom 2), you would simply “plug and play.” Until now, that’s all we really knew, but today the company is announcing “Made for Solo” — a program that will standardize, and encourage the development of third-party accessories for the self-proclaimed “smart drone.” If you make infrared cameras, for example, you could make a version just for Solo and have it work seamlessly with the drone’s GPS and smart flight modes. Basically, any gadget, sensor or product that could squeeze into, and be lifted by, a quadcopter could be integrated into the Solo as if it were native to the product. Continue reading